Pavel Janák

Architect, urban planner, designer and teacher Pavel Janák was the leading theorist of the Czech Cubist movement. He saw the slanting surfaces and crystalline forms of Cubism as an expression of the power of the human spirit overcoming the formative power of nature.

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Josef Gočár

Josef Gočár occupies a prominent position in the history of Czech architecture of the first half of the 20th century. Although he found application for his skills in architecture, his designs for furniture, clocks and lamps from the years 1911 through 1920 in many cases defined Czech Cubism as an independent style. Gočár did not […]

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Adolf Loos

“Ornament is crime” declaimed Adolf Loos – an influential architect, designer and campaigner for simplicity and functionality in design. Yet despite the striking simplicity of his exteriors, Loos’ interiors were decorated comfortably, with Persian rugs, decorative furniture and luxurious inlaid or stone-tiled walls. Such is the interior of the Villa Müller in Prague, which Loos […]

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Vlastislav Hofman

Vlastislav Hofman found the best outlet for his many talents in stage design, but he also painted, worked in town planning and bridge building for Prague, designed buildings, interiors, furniture and decorative objects, and wrote prolifically on design theory. In 1911 Hofman became the first to design furniture in the Czech Cubist style. Vlastislav Hofman, […]

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Ladislav Sutnar

Sutnar is best described by the word pioneer, because he developed new ways of thinking and creating. He boldly realised things that today’s generation takes for granted. With his all-round talent he joined the community of modern European designers and architects who were striving to maximise the quality of the everyday environment. The breadth of […]

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Rudolf Stockar

Rudolf Stockar (1886 – 1957) Rudolf Stockar made his name in the design of ceramics, jewellery and furniture. His career was particularly dominated by the decorative arts between 1915 and 1927 when Stockar worked as the director of Artěl – an important designers’ cooperative running the production and distribution of its members’ work. Whatever style Stockar […]

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Adolf Matura

Adolf Matura was active in several glassmaking disciplines. He is known as a creator of cut and carved glass and a designer of pressed glass, but his designs also include a set of teacups and teapot made of borosilicate glass. In the beginning his work focused on designs for tableware and accessory glass formed by […]

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Jaroslav Ježek

A leading Czech designer who gained fame for his practical and figural porcelain items. One of the representatives of the Brussels style. At the 1958 World Expo this style is named after he represented Czechoslovakia very successfully, taking away two major awards.

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Václav Špála

Václav Špála is a phenomenon of Czech modern art. His work was both uncritically admired and condemned by the public and he remains one of the country’s artists most sought after by collectors. Although he is perceived primarily as a painter, he also worked in stage, poster and book cover design and last but not […]

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Jožka Baruch

Jožka Baruch was born in Moravia on July 28th, 1892. He studied at the State Vocational School for woodworking, graduating as a figural and ornamental woodcarver. He continued his studies at the Academy of Applied Arts in Prague, where he studied painting and printmaking. It was prints, especially woodcuts, which became Baruch’s most significant form […]

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Willem Hendrik Gispen

  In 1916, the industrial designer and architect Willem Hendrik Gispen (1890-1981) began an ornamental smithy in Rotterdam. The first products were applied art pieces and unique items in wrought iron, copper and bronze. In 1926, Gispen started the production of Giso lamps, and three years later, the first steel tube chairs for home and […]

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