Czech Cubism

Sharp points, slicing planes, crystalline shapes. These are the trademarks of the Czech Cubists – a unique, avant-garde group, feverishly active in Prague between 1910 and 1914. As well as fine art, they left behind them building facades prickling with little pyramids, furniture bursting with energy, and decorative objects dynamized with stark black lines. Four […]

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Functionalism

The Paris Expo was the climax and thus the beginning of the decline for the Czech decorative style. In the second half of the 1920s, its main protagonists, particularly Josef Gocar, and the new generation of architects and designers (Jindrich Halabala, Antonin Heythum, Bohumil Juznic, Jaromir Krejcar, Antonin Kybal, Ladislav Sutnar, Jan Vanek and Ladislav […]

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Art Deco

Modernista’s most frequent pieces come from the period 1925 to 1945 – when Czech mass-produced furniture had its own distinctive style. With functionalism being the predominant influence, Czech furniture of the period was less decorative and more angular than its French or Belgian equivalent, to complement the clean lines of the buildings. Walnut was the […]

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Brussels

In the post war years, Czech applied art suffered terribly under the Communist regime which in its paranoia was unable to distinguish avantgarde, originality and progress from counter revolutionary gestures and pro-western idealism. But although planned economy and exciting design are poor bed fellows and in times of material shortage, the quality of applied art […]

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